SolarSuperState Prize

SolarSuperState Prize

2018

Paraguay and Uruguay win SolarSuperState Prizes 2018 in category SolarSuperState

SolarSuperState Prize 2018

Prize winner states

  • SolarSuperState Prize category SolarSuperState: Paraguay
  • SolarSuperState Prize category SolarSuperState: Uruguay
  • 2. SolarSuperState Prize category Wind: Germany
  • 3. SolarSuperState Prize category Wind: Sweden
  • 1. SolarSuperState Prize category Solar: Liechtenstein
  • 2. SolarSuperState Prize category Solar: Germany

The SolarSuperState Association awarded 6 SolarSuperState Prizes 2018 to 5 states on 2.7.2018. The award ceremony was in the Solarzentrum Mecklenburg-Vorpommern in Germany. There are three prize categories. States with more than 100 % domestic renewable electricity production versus consumption can win a SolarSuperState Prize in the category SolarSuperState. The categories Wind and Solar are possible for the top three states of the world for cumulative installed power per population.

Between 1985 and 2016, Paraguay produced every year renewable electricity that exceeded at least 300 % of its domestic electricity consumption. Therefore, Paraguay wins a SolarSuperState Prize 2018 in the category SolarSuperState. Roberto Maidana from the embassy of Paraguay in Germany fetched the Prize.

Since 2014, Uruguay produces every year more than 100 % renewable electricity. This remarkable achievement was possible despite an increase of the domestic gross electricity consumption of 34 percent in the last 18 years. For this reason, Uruguay wins a SolarSuperState Prize 2018 in the category SolarSuperState. The Uruguayan consul general in Germany Maria del Lujan Barcelo fetched the prize for Uruguay.

Germany and Sweden win the second and the third SolarSuperState Prize 2018 in the category Wind. They have 670 and 660 Watt wind power per capita at the end of 2017. Arno Zengerle, mayor of Wildpoldsried, said that the Bavarian regulation about a minimum distance of some 2 kilometers between large wind turbines and housing areas is an obstacle for wind power deployment in Bavaria.

Liechtenstein and Germany win the first and second SolarSuperState Prize 2018 in the category solar. They have 620 and 510 Watt photovoltaic power per capita at the end of 2017. Jürg Senn from the ministry of Economic Affairs of Liechtenstein fetched the Prize for Liechtenstein. He pointed to the improvement of investment subsidies for facade photovoltaics. The new framework is valid since June. Christfried Lenz fetched the Prize for Germany. He demanded a prohibition of the production of new fossil fuel cars by 2021.

2017

Uruguay wins SolarSuperState Prize 2017 in category SolarSuperState

SolarSuperState Prize 2017 category SolarSuperState: Uruguay

Prize winner states

  • 1. SolarSuperState Prize category
    SolarSuperState: Uruguay
  • 2. SolarSuperState Prize category Wind: Sweden
  • 1. SolarSuperState Prize category Federal State: Nevada
  • 1. SolarSuperState Prize category Region: Moapa River Indian Reservation

1. SolarSuperState Prize 2017 category
SolarSuperState: Uruguay

Urugauy wins 1. SolarSuperState Prize in the category SolarSuperState

On Friday, 20 October 2017, inside the International Energy and Sustainability Conference 2017 in Farmingdale College (a New York State University), Ricardo Baluga, deputy chief of mission of the embassy of Uruguay in the United States of America, fetched the first SolarSuperState Prize 2017 in the category SolarSuperState on behalf of Uruguay. Darren Daboda, chairman of the tribal council of the Moapa River Indian Reservation (surrounded by the US state Nevada) fetched the

Nevada SolarSuperState Prize 2017 in category Federal State

1. SolarSuperState Prize in the category Federal State for Nevada

and the

Moapa River Indian Reservation solarSuperState Prize category Region

1. SolarSuperState Prize in the category Region on behalf of the Moapa River Indian Reservation.

Sweden wins 2. SolarSuperState Prize 2017 in category Wind

2. SolarSuperState Prize 2017 in category Wind for Sweden

On 10.5.2017, at the renewable energy conference of Sveriges Energieföreningars RiksOrganisation SERO in the Gekas Hotel Ullared (Sweden), the Swedish energy minister Ibrahim Baylan fetched the 2. SolarSuperState Prize 2017 in the category Wind for Sweden. Sweden is second in the ranking with a cumulative installed power of some 650 Watt per capita at the end of 2016. On the question about the political measures to save the five biggest cities of Sweden (Stockholm, Göteborg, Malmö, Uppsala, Västeras) from the destruction by the long-term sea-level rise by Greenland and Antarctica ice-sheet melting, Baylan replied that the government ˈs plan to switch until 2040 to a 100 % renewable energy economy is the Swedish answer to this threat. On the question about the proposal of a legal obligation to allow new building roofs only as photovoltaic roofs, he said that he does not recommend such a legal measure, and that photovoltaics cannot significantly contribute to the huge electricity demand in winter and mentioned that the future availability of cheap electricity storage options will automatically boost photovoltaics usage in Sweden.

2016

Kingdom of Denmark 1. SolarSuperState Prize category Wind

SolarSuperState Prize winner photo 2016

Prize winner states

On 30 June 2016 in Koeln, Germany, Stig Aagaard (Foreign ministry of Denmark) fetched the 1. SolarSuperState Prize 2016 in the category Wind for the Kingdom of Denmark. Juerg Senn (Ministry of economy of Liechtenstein) fetched the 1. SolarSuperState Prize 2016 in the category Solar for Liechtenstein.

Laudation Kingdom of Denmark 2016

The Kingdom of Denmark is a pioneer state for wind energy. The Danish success story started some 125 years ago with the first state funded wind turbine for electricity production in Askow (1891). This early know-how was used later in the 20th century to develop the Danish concept of wind turbines which is the globally dominating concept for wind energy. Often changing national wind energy policies during the last 40 years were sufficient to establish and keep the world number one position in cumulative installed wind power per population since around 1980. At the end of the year 2015, Denmark ranks number one in the world with a cumulative installed wind power of some 880 Watt per capita. Therefore, the Kingdom of Denmark wins the 1. SolarSuperState Prize 2016 in the category Wind. Congratulations.

Laudation Liechtenstein 2016

Liechtenstein politically pushed photovoltaics since 2008 by a national feed-in tariff law for renewable electricity (Energieeffizienzgesetz, EEG). This legal framework encouraged private house owners to build photovoltaics on the rooftops of the houses. At the end of the year 2015, Liechtenstein ranks number one in the world with a cumulative installed photovoltaic power of some 530 Watt per capita. Liechtenstein wins the 1. SolarSuperState Prize 2016 in the category Solar. Congratulations.

2015

Liechtenstein wins 1. SolarSuperState Prize 2015 in category Solar

SoolarSuperState Prize 2015 winner photo

Prize winner states

  • 1. SolarSuperState Prize category Solar: Liechtenstein
  • 2. SolarSuperState Prize category Solar: Germany
  • 3. SolarSuperState Prize category Solar: Italy
  • 1. SolarSuperState Prize category Wind: Kingdom of Denmark

2014

Cateogry Solar 1. Prize Germany

SolarSuperState Prize 2014 press photo

Prize winner states

  • 1. SolarSuperState Prize category Wind: Kingdom of Denmark
  • 3. SolarSuperState Prize category Wind: Sweden
  • 1. SolarSuperState Prize cateogry Solar: Germany
  • 2. SolarSuperState Prize cateogry Solar: Liechtenstein
  • 3. SolarSuperState Prize cateogry Solar: Italy

1. SolarSuperState Prize 2014 category Wind: Kingdom of Denmark (laudation)

In the year 1891, the Danish government funded the first Danish wind mill for electricity production in Askov. The project was initiated by scientist Poul la Cour. This was the starting point of the Danish wind energy technology development. Another milestone in the support of the Danish government for wind energy was the funding of the 200 Kilowatt Gedser wind turbine. Johannes Juul engineered this wind turbine which started operation in 1957.
The Danish feed-in-tariff law for wind energy of the year 1992 was the foundation of the rapid domestic market enlargement for wind turbines in Denmark. The law guaranteed grid access and a “fair price” for wind power at 85 % of the retail electricity rate. Furthermore, the Danish government obliged the Danish municipalities to identify suitable sites for wind turbines and to organize public hearings before officially fixing wind turbine sites. The environment minister (later also energy minister) Svend Auken was the key person in the Danish government promoting wind energy between 1992 and 2000. In the year 2000, the annual additions of wind turbines reached a preliminary peak with some 120 Watt per capita. At the end of the year 2000, the cumulative installed wind power was some 440 Watt per capita. By 2001, wind turbine cooperatives, including more than 100 000 families, had installed 86 % of all turbines in Denmark. In the year 2013, the net annual additions of wind energy reached almost the level of the year 2000 with now some 117 Watt per capita. In the year 2013, Denmark still ranks number one in the world with a cumulative installed wind power of some 840 Watts per capita.

3. SolarSuperState Prize 2014 category Wind: Sweden (laudation)

In the year 2006, the Swedish parliament made a law with the obligation
for almost all electricity users to buy a certain part of the new renewable
energy electricity to be produced during the next 10 years. Since 2009, Sweden shortened the permitting procedure for new wind turbines. The permitting process is since then based only on the Environmental Code instead of several other regulations. The Swedish Energy Agency has pointed out suitable areas of national interest for wind energy production. The counties, local authorities and the Swedish Energy Agency control the planning of the municipalities in order to get enough sites for new wind turbines. At the end of the year 2013, Sweden ranks third in the world with a cumulative installed wind power of some 470 Watts per capita.

1. SolarSuperState Prize 2014 cateogry Solar: Germany (laudation)

In 1989, the Aachen based non-profit non-governmental organization
Solarenergie Foerderverein Deutschland e. V. suggested a “Cost
Covering Feed-in Tariff” for solar electricity (“kostendeckende
Einspeiseverguetung fuer Solarstrom”) at the level of the federal
state. The basic outline included:

  • priority access to the grid
  • feed-in compensation level based on a technically optimized installation of the same year of manufacture and on economic operation of this installation including an appropriate profit
  • compensation period 20 years
  • coverage of the additional costs by the electricity customers

For the fourth reason, such a Cost Covering Feed-in Tariff is no subsidy. In 1990, a feed-in tariff law for renewable electricity (Stromeinspeisungsgesetz) was passed by the federal parliament. It came into force in 1991. This feed-in tariff law guaranteed for solar electricity grid access and a feed-in tariff of 90 % of the average electricity retail price (some 8 Euro cents per Kilowatthour at that time). This was not sufficient for photovoltaics but another support for feed-in tariffs at city level.

In 2000, the members of the German parliament Hans-Josef Fell, Michele Hustedt, Hermann Scheer and Dietmar Schuetz initiated a national cost-covering feed-in-tariff law – Renewable Energy Act (Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz, EEG). The tariff for solar electricity was limited to 99 Pfennig (some 50 Euro cents) per Kilowatthour. This law triggered the rapid global photovoltaic market enlargement in the first decade of this millenium. In 2013, Germany ranks number one in the world with a cumulative installed photovoltaic power of some 450 Watts per capita.

2. SolarSuperState Prize 2014 cateogry Solar: Liechtenstein (laudation)

In 2007, the Deputy Prime Minister at that time, Klaus Tschuetscher,
initiated the first feed-in tariff law of the country. This feed-in tariff law for renewable electricity (Energieeffizienzgesetz, EEG) had a validity period of only five years. The validity period of the law regarding the feed-in tariff ended in the year 2013. This outdated law guaranteed for photovoltaic electricity producers

  1. priority access to the grid
  2. feed-in compensation for 10 years
  3. subsidies for a photovoltaic installation

Often, the municipalities added more subsidies for photovoltaic installations. The additional costs for the feed-in compensation were paid by the electricity customers. Currently, the parliament plans to add a second five year period for a feed-in tariff with a validity period from 2013 to 2018. In July 2014, the national electricity utility company supports the government in paying voluntarily a preliminary feed-in tariff. Several photovoltaic electricity producers consume some of the produced electricity directly in their buildings. This is an additional driving force for the continued photovoltaic deployment in Liechtenstein. At the end of the year 2013, Liechtenstein ranks number two in the world with a cumulative installed photovoltaic power of some 410 Watt per capita.

3. SolarSuperState Prize 2014 cateogry Solar: Italy (laudation)

The Italian feed-in tariff regulation with the name “Conto
Energia” was based on three laws / regulations

  1. Decreto Legislativo 387 passed by the parliament in 2003
  2. Decreto Ministeriale from 28 July 2005
  3. Delibra 188 from 14 September 2005

The costs were and are payed by the consumers of electricity via
the mandatory tariff levy A3, which exists since 1991 in order to
finance special electricity production. In 2005, the first photovoltaic installation was registered under the new feed-in tariff scheme “Primo Conto Energia”. After reaching the cumulative power limits of one Conto Energia several times a new Conto Energia was launched by the government. In 2011, the first installation was registered under the up to date last “Quinto Conto Energia”. In total, there exist five Conto Energia (Primo, Secondo, Terzo, Quarto, Quinto). The original regulations guaranteed a feed-in tariff for 20 years. At the end of the year 2013, Italy ranks number three in the world with a cumulative installed photovoltaic power of some 290 Watt per capita.

2013

Spain wins a SolarSuperState Prize category Wind

SolarsuperState Prize 2013
  • 1. SolarSuperState Prize category Wind: Kingdom of Denmark
  • 2. SolarSuperState Prize category Wind: Spain
  • 3. SolarSuperState Prize category Wind: Portugal
  • 1. SolarSuperState Prize cateogry Solar: Germany
  • 2. SolarSuperState Prize cateogry Solar: Liechtenstein

SolarSuperState Prize 2013 laudations
The official laudation texts for the winner states are here:

1. SolarSuperState Prize 2013 category Wind: Kingdom of Denmark

1. SolarSuperState Prize 2013 category Wind Kingdom of Denmark

In the year 1891, 122 years ago, the Danish government funded the first Danish wind mill for electricity production in Askov. The project was initiated by scientist Poul la Cour. In the year of his death in 1908, some 30 wind turbines for electricity operation existed in Denmark. Already at that time, electricity from oil was cheaper than from wind. This situation continued during most of the twentieth century, except in war times, when Danish oil supply for electricity production was curtailed. The first wind energy boom occurred during the first World War 1914 to 1918: the total number of wind mills for electricity production exceeded 120. The second wind energy boom took place during the second World War 1939 to 1945 with a total number of wind turbines exceeding 1400.

The third wind energy boom started after the first oil shock in 1973 and culminated in the year 2000 with more than 6000 operating wind turbines. The wind energy boom during the world wars was enabled by the existence of an industry which was capable of manufacturing wind mills for the production of electricity, as well as for mechanical work such as grinding, cutting straw or water pumping. In 1973, however, the Danish industry was not ready to replace oil-fired electricity by wind power despite the innovations of Johannes Juul in 1957 with his 200 Kilowatt Gedser wind turbine. In 1973, the Danish industrial production capacity for wind turbines was zero and Johannes Juul had passed away for 4 years earlier. Denmark had to reinvent its wind energy industry.
The first public research and development program for Wind Power after the oil crisis 1973 was launched in 1976. The very first task was to repair and restart Johannes Juul’s historic wind turbine in Gedser . Another important milestone was the establishment of a test station for wind turbines at Risø National Laboratory in 1978. The mainstream activities of the emerging Danish wind energy industry after 1973 were focused on smaller wind turbines below 60 Kilowatt because of a lack of manufacturing experience.
The Second Energy Plan 1981 (Energiplan 81) of the government supported wind energy with subsidies. In 1985, the government restricted certain ownership models for wind turbines. Local wind energy cooperatives became the mainstream for investment in wind energy as from 1986. The subsidies for new wind turbines ended in 1986. The annual additions peaked temporarily in 1988. Between 1989 and 1995, the annual additions fell below the level of 1988. In 1996, the main Danish wind energy boom started. In summary, the cumulative installed capacity grew from some 0.5 Watt per capita in 1980 to some 60 Watts per capita in 1990.
In 1992, the Danish feed-in-tariff for wind energy guaranteed grid access and a “fair price” for wind power at 85 % of the retail electricity rate. Furthermore, the Danish government obliged the Danish municipalities to identify suitable sites for wind turbines and to organize public hearings before officially fixing wind turbine sites. The environment minister (later also energy minister) Svend Auken was the key person in the Danish government promoting wind energy between 1992 and 2000. In 1993, the feedin-tariff was reduced and new subsidies were introduced in the form of tax incentives and direct payments from the revenue of a Danish carbon tax. In the year 2000, the annual additions of wind turbines reached a preliminary peak with some 120 Watt per capita. At the end of the year 2000, the cumulative installed wind power was some 440 Watts per capita. By 2001, wind turbine cooperatives, including more than 100 000 families, had installed 86 % of all turbines in Denmark. In the year 2012, Denmark still ranks number one in the world with a cumulative installed wind power of some 730 Watts per capita. In 2012, some 5000 wind turbines produced some 34 % of the Danish gross electricity production.

2. SolarSuperState Prize 2013 category Wind: Spain

2. SolarSuperState Prize 2013 category Wind: Spain

In 1980, the Law of Energy Conservation (Ley 82 / 80 de Conservación de la Energía) gave the right to grid access for wind power and other renewable electricity.
In the 1980s, the Spanish government subsidized the development and deployment of several wind turbines and wind farms. In 1983, two prototypes of an 24 Kilowatt wind turbine were tested at Alfabia (Mallorca). In 1984, the first 15 Kilowatt wind turbine of the cooperative Ecotècnia was installed in Vilopriu, province of Girona, in Catalonia. The Royal Decree 2366 of 1994 introduced feed-in tariffs for wind energy and other renewable energies. The feed-in compensaton was some 80 – 90 % of the mean retail price of electricity.
In 1997, the Electric Power Act (Ley 54 / 1997 del Sector Eléctrico Español ) granted priority access to the grid and a feed-in-tariff for electricity from wind power. Further amendments and modifications to the law and degrees were made in the years 1998, 1999, 2001, 2004 and 2007. The regional governments were primarily responsible for the administrative and permitting processes. The autonomous regions of Spain especially Navarra provided additional support to both foreign and domestic investors in the 1990s to set up manufacturing units in Spain. The main motivation was the increase of local employment.
In the year 2007, the annual additions of wind turbines reached the preliminary peak with some 80 Watts per capita. At the end of the year 2007, the cumulative installed wind power was some 330 Watt per capita. In 2012, some 22 Gigawatts wind turbines produced some 17 % of the Spanish gross electricity production and 18 % of the net electricity consumption. In the year 2012, Spain ranks second in the world with a cumulative installed wind power of some 480 Watts per capita.

3. SolarSuperState Prize 2013 category Wind: Portugal

3. SolarSuperState Prize 2013 category Wind: Portugal

In the year 1986, a wind park was build on the island Porto Santo in the Madeira island group. The wind park “Figueiral” on the island Santa Maria of the Azores followed in 1988. The first wind park on the mainland of Portugal opened in the municipality Sines in the year 1992. In 1995, the Decree-Law number 313 / 95 guaranteed the first time grid access for wind power. In 1999, the Decree-Law 168 / 99 specified a feed-in tariff system. In 2001, the Decree-Law 312 / 2001 supported the wind energy sector by clarifying the licencegranting process for grid access and simplifying the administrative procedures. In the same year, the Decree-Law 339-C / 2001 improved the feed-in tariff for investors.
Between 2001 and 2005, a major source of investment support was the “Incentive Scheme for Rational Use of Energy – Renewable Energies” which provided capital grants for different types of renewable installations. The scheme was run by the Ministry for Industry and Energy and supported by the European Union. In the year 2008, the annual additions of wind turbines reached the preliminary peak with some 90 Watt per capita. At the end of the year 2008, the cumulative installed wind power stood at some 300 Watt per capita. In the same year, Enercon launched its rotor blade and tower production which was at that time the biggest wind energy manufacturing site in the country. In 2012, some 5 Gigawatts wind turbines produced some 21 % of the Portuguese gross electricity production. At the end of the year 2012, Portugal ranks third in the world with a cumulative installed wind power of some 430 Watt per capita.

1. SolarSuperState Prize 2013 cateogry Solar: Germany

1. SolarSuperState Prize 2013 category Solar: Germany

In 1989, the Aachen based non-profit non-governmental organization Solarenergie Foerderverein Deutschland e. V. suggested a “Cost Covering Feed-in Tariff” for solar electricity (“kostendeckende Einspeiseverguetung fuer Solarstrom”) at the level of the federal state. The basic outline included:

  1. priority access to the grid
  2. feed-in compensation level based on a technically optimized installation of the same year of manufacture and on economic operation of this installation including an appropriate profit
  3. compensation period 20 years
  4. coverage of the additional costs by the electricity customers

For the reason 4, such a Cost Covering Feed-in Tariff is no subsidy.
In 1990, a feed-in tariff law for renewable electricity (Stromeinspeisungsgesetz) was passed by the federal parliament. It came into force in 1991. This feed-in tariff law guaranteed for solar electricity grid access and a feed-in tariff of 90 % of the average electricity retail price (some 8 Euro cents per Kilowatthour at that time). This was not sufficient for photovoltaics but another support for feed-in tariffs at city level.
In 1993, the Bavarian cities Hammelburg and Freising were the first German cities with a cost-covering feed-in tariff for photovoltaics. Then some 40 other German cities followed. In 2000, the members of the German parliament Hans-Josef Fell, Michele Hustedt, Hermann Scheer and Dietmar Schuetz initiated a national cost-covering feed-in-tariff law – Renewable Energy Act (Erneuerbare-Energien-Gesetz, EEG). The tariff for solar electricity was limited to 99 Pfennig (some 50 Euro cents) per Kilowatthour. Additionally, the bank Kreditanstalt fuer Wiederaufbau KfW granted low interest rates for the first new 300 Megawatts photovoltaics on roofs of buildings. In 2011, the feed-in-tariffs were between 20 and 30 Euro cents per kilowatthour. In 2012, the annual additions of photovoltaics peaked preliminarily at some 94 Watts per capita. Germany ranks number one in the world with a cumulative installed photovoltaic power of some 400 Watts per capita. Some 32 Gigawatts photovoltaics produced approximately 5 % of the German electricity production and consumption.

2. SolarSuperState Prize 2013 cateogry Solar: Liechtenstein

2. SolarSuperState Prize 2013 category Solar: Lichtenstein

In 2007, the first feed-in law of the country was initiated. In 2008, this feed-in tariff law for renewable electricity (Energieeffizienzgesetz, EEG) was passed by the parliament and then came into force. The law guaranteed for photovoltaic electricity producers

  1. priority access to the grid
  2. feed-in compensation for 10 years
  3. subsidies for a photovoltaic installation

Often, the municipalities added more subsidies for photovoltaic installations. The additional costs for the feed-in compensation were paid by the electricity customers. In total, this legal framework boosted the annual additions from some 3 Watt per capita per year in 2008 to some 95 Watt per capita per year in 2012. This is an average annual growth rate of some +137 % over a period of 4 years. At the end of the year 2012, Liechtenstein ranks number two in the world with a cumulative installed photovoltaic power of some 290 Watt per capita. Some 11 Megawatts photovoltaics produced approximately 2 % of the electricity consumption and some 10 % of the domestic electricity production.

2012

Vatican wins a SolarsuperState Prize

  • 1. SolarSuperState Prize category Wind: Kingdom of Denmark
  • 2. SolarSuperState Prize category Wind: Spain
  • 1. SolarSuperState Prize cateogry Solar: Germany
  • 2. SolarSuperState Prize cateogry Solar: Vatican City State
  • 3. SolarSuperState Prize category Solar: Italy
2. SolarSuperState Prize 2012 category Solar: Vatican City State

The SolarSuperState Prize 2012 winner states have been selected according to their ranking in the SolarSuperState competition 2012. The Prize winner states were in the category Wind prizes were awarded to the Kingdom of Denmark and Spain and in the category Solar to Germany, Vatican City State and Italy. On 14 August 2012 in Zürich (Switzerland), citizens of the winner states fetched these SolarSuperState Prizes.

1. SolarSuperState Prize 2012 category Wind: Kingdom of Denmark

1. SolarSuperState Prize 2012 category wind: Kingdom of Denmark

On 31.12.2011, the cumulative installed wind power of the Kingdom of Denmark was some 700 Watts per capita. Regarding this metric, the Kingdom of Denmark is the best state of the world. Therefore, the Kingdom of Denmark wins the first SolarSuperState Prize 2012 in the category Wind.

2. SolarSuperState Prize 2012 category Wind: Spain

On 31.12.2011, the cumulative installed wind power of Spain was some 460 Watts per capita. For this reason, Spain wins the second SolarSuperState Prize 2012 in the category Wind.

2. SolarSuperState Prize 2012 category Wind: Spain

Pere Escorsa, co-founder of the former Spanish wind turbine manufacturer Ecotècnia fetched the second prize for Spain in the category Wind. In his speech, Escorsa expressed concern whether Spain can remain in the forefront of wind energy because of a discrimination of wind energy by higher taxes compared to fossil electricity production (including nuclear energy).

1. SolarSuperState Prize 2012 category Solar: Germany

On 31.12.2011, the cumulative installed photovoltaic power of Germany was some 300 Watts per capita. Regarding this metric, Germany is the best state of the world. Therefore, Germany wins the first SolarSuperState Prize 2012 in the category Solar.

1. SolarSuperState Prize 2012 category Solar: Germany

Dr. Franz Alt, journalist and book author, fetched the first SolarSuperState Prize in the category SOLAR for Germany. Dr. Alt described that solar energy policy is also a good social policy enabling democratic ownership and low-income people in Germany to participate from the income generated by photovoltaic electricity production. He named as example the Bavarian village of Niederbergkirchen.

2. SolarSuperState Prize cateogry Solar: Vatican City State

On 31.12.2011, the cumulative installed photovoltaic power of the Vatican City State was some 270 Watts per capita. Regarding this metric, the Vatican City State ranks as number two in the world. Therefore, the Vatican City State wins the second SolarSuperState Prize 2012 in the category Solar.

Dr. Franz Alt fetched also the second SolarSuperState Prize in the category Solar for the Vatican City State. Dr. Alt has been a moving spirit for the now more than 800 photovoltaic installations on rooftops of churches in Germany. Dr. Alt interprets photovoltaics on churches as a symbol for the integrity of creation. Dr. Alt encourages the pope to make an appeal, that the owners of preferably all catholic church buildings of the world should follow this good example and harvest “energy from the very, very top”. The solar energy is a heavenly energy, a godsend. Dr. Alts appeal: Church rooftops could be globally lighthouses for the solar energy transition of the national economies. The catholic church could fit in with the word of Jesus: “for He causes His sun to rise on the evil and the good” thus for all. In all religions of the world, the sun is a divine symbol, said Dr. Franz Alt. The Prize should be a motive for preferably many churches, to follow the good example of the Vatican.

3. SolarSuperState Prize category Solar: Italy

3. SolarSuperState Prize category Solar: Italy

On 31.12.2011, the cumulative installed photovoltaic power of Italy was some 210 Watts per capita. Regarding this metric, Italy ranks as number three in the world. Therefore, Italy wins the third SolarSuperState Prize 2012 in the category Solar.

Dr. Giuliano Grassi former coworker of the European Commission for renewable energy fetched the third SolarSuperState Prize in the category SOLAR for Italy. Dr. Grassi demanded from the Italian government a long-term photovoltaic program with price guarantees and a simplification of authorization. The current complicated authorization procedures may favor corruption in Italy.